EGS Collab Experiment #2: Continuous broadband seismic waveform data

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Two broadband seismometers were installed on the 4100 level and recorded for the duration of EGS Collab Experiment #2. Inspired by published data from similar instruments installed in the Aspo Hard Rock Lab, these long-period instruments aimed to measure the tilting of the drift in response to the injection of fluid into the testbed.

One instrument was installed underneath the wellheads in Site A (aka the "battery" alcove) and the other was installed along the east wall of the drift, south of Site B. Due to the feet of gravel (ballast) laid along the floor of the drift, we were unable to anchor the sensors directly to the rock. As a result, the coupling of the sensors to the experiment rock volume is likely poor. In addition, there are a number of noise sources that complicate the interpretation of the data. For example, sensor BBB is installed adjacent (within 3 ft) to the rail line that runs towards the Ross shaft. Trains (motors) run along this line almost daily and produce a large signal in these data. Careful extraction of periods of interest, as well as filtering for specific signals, is necessary.

The sensors are Nanometrics Trillium Compact Posthole seismometers, sensitive down to 120 seconds period. They were installed as close to the drift wall and as deep as we could manually excavate (only about 1 ft or so). The holes were leveled with sand and the sensors were placed on a paver before backfilling with sand. The hole was then covered by a bucket filled with insulation to improve the sensor's isolation from daily temperature variations, which are minor but present due to drift ventilation from the surface.

Data were recorded on Nanometrics Centaur digitizers at 100 Hz. The full response information is available in the StationXML file provided here, or by querying the sensors through the IRIS DMC (see links below). These instruments were provided free of charge through the IRIS PASSCAL instrument center. The network code is XP and the station codes are BBA and BBB. The waveform data can be queried through the IRIS FDSN server using any method the user likes. One convenient option is to use the Obspy python package: https://docs.obspy.org/packages/obspy.clients.fdsn.html

Citation Formats

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. (2022). EGS Collab Experiment #2: Continuous broadband seismic waveform data [data set]. Retrieved from https://gdr.openei.org/submissions/1422.
Export Citation to RIS
Rodriguez Tribaldos, Veronica. EGS Collab Experiment #2: Continuous broadband seismic waveform data . United States: N.p., 12 Sep, 2022. Web. https://gdr.openei.org/submissions/1422.
Rodriguez Tribaldos, Veronica. EGS Collab Experiment #2: Continuous broadband seismic waveform data . United States. https://gdr.openei.org/submissions/1422
Rodriguez Tribaldos, Veronica. 2022. "EGS Collab Experiment #2: Continuous broadband seismic waveform data ". United States. https://gdr.openei.org/submissions/1422.
@div{oedi_1422, title = {EGS Collab Experiment #2: Continuous broadband seismic waveform data }, author = {Rodriguez Tribaldos, Veronica.}, abstractNote = {Two broadband seismometers were installed on the 4100 level and recorded for the duration of EGS Collab Experiment #2. Inspired by published data from similar instruments installed in the Aspo Hard Rock Lab, these long-period instruments aimed to measure the tilting of the drift in response to the injection of fluid into the testbed.

One instrument was installed underneath the wellheads in Site A (aka the "battery" alcove) and the other was installed along the east wall of the drift, south of Site B. Due to the feet of gravel (ballast) laid along the floor of the drift, we were unable to anchor the sensors directly to the rock. As a result, the coupling of the sensors to the experiment rock volume is likely poor. In addition, there are a number of noise sources that complicate the interpretation of the data. For example, sensor BBB is installed adjacent (within 3 ft) to the rail line that runs towards the Ross shaft. Trains (motors) run along this line almost daily and produce a large signal in these data. Careful extraction of periods of interest, as well as filtering for specific signals, is necessary.

The sensors are Nanometrics Trillium Compact Posthole seismometers, sensitive down to 120 seconds period. They were installed as close to the drift wall and as deep as we could manually excavate (only about 1 ft or so). The holes were leveled with sand and the sensors were placed on a paver before backfilling with sand. The hole was then covered by a bucket filled with insulation to improve the sensor's isolation from daily temperature variations, which are minor but present due to drift ventilation from the surface.

Data were recorded on Nanometrics Centaur digitizers at 100 Hz. The full response information is available in the StationXML file provided here, or by querying the sensors through the IRIS DMC (see links below). These instruments were provided free of charge through the IRIS PASSCAL instrument center. The network code is XP and the station codes are BBA and BBB. The waveform data can be queried through the IRIS FDSN server using any method the user likes. One convenient option is to use the Obspy python package: https://docs.obspy.org/packages/obspy.clients.fdsn.html}, doi = {}, url = {https://gdr.openei.org/submissions/1422}, journal = {}, number = , volume = , place = {United States}, year = {2022}, month = {09}}

The sensors are Nanometrics Trillium Compact Posthole seismometers, sensitive down to 120 seconds period. They were installed as close to the drift wall and as deep as we could manually excavate (only about 1 ft or so). The holes were leveled with sand and the sensors were placed on a paver before backfilling with sand. The hole was then covered by a bucket filled with insulation to improve the sensor's isolation from daily temperature variations, which are minor but present due to drift ventilation from the surface.

Data were recorded on Nanometrics Centaur digitizers at 100 Hz. The full response information is available in the StationXML file provided here, or by querying the sensors through the IRIS DMC (see links below). These instruments were provided free of charge through the IRIS PASSCAL instrument center. The network code is XP and the station codes are BBA and BBB. The waveform data can be queried through the IRIS FDSN server using any method the user likes. One convenient option is to use the Obspy python package: https://docs.obspy.org/packages/obspy.clients.fdsn.html}, doi = {}, url = {https://gdr.openei.org/submissions/1422}, journal = {}, number = , volume = , place = {United States}, year = {2022}, month = {09}}" readonly />

Details

Data from Sep 12, 2022

Last updated Oct 5, 2022

Submitted Oct 5, 2022

Organization

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Contact

Chet Hopp

Authors

Veronica Rodriguez Tribaldos

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

DOE Project Details

Project Name EGS Collab

Project Lead Lauren Boyd

Project Number EE0032708

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